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The Struggle is REAL

Hi there,

I am new to the group and site so here it goes: I have had T1D for 22 years and I STILL can’t get me poop in a group! I started out on pills then eventually I was put on insulin very soon after being diagnosed. I don’t know what it is about keeping up with my BS but I don’t manage it. Don’t get me wrong I want to VERY VERY badly. Not only for myself but for my son and husband too. I keep telling myself “you can do this” and “I’ll start over tomorrow,” but I either don’t or the same thing happens the next day. On top of not checking my BS and taking my insulin I eat terribly! If I want candy; I am going to eat candy. I guess I just feel like I don’t have the time or energy to do this. I know I need to and I want to but it’s like the straw that broke the camel’s back. I do want to say thought that along with T1D, I have also been diagnosed with depression and anxiety due to depression.

Wow! Anyways any and all advice is very welcome and appreciated! I was also hoping to possibly find a “diabetes buddy.” Someone that can relate to what it’s like having this whole part of your life that you have to deal with and no one around you can relate.

  • #122776
  • Hey there I am also new to this group. I have been T1D for…wow 17 years now! Just had to really stop and think about it. I was diagnosed at 8 and will be 25 in 9 days. I feel your struggle and pain. It’s difficult for people to understand who don’t know what your going through. My fiance tries his best to understand but it frusterates me when people try to micro manage my diabetes without knowing what it’s like. For instance my fiance will sometimes say “Should you really eat that babe it has a lot of sugar..” And its so frustrating because obviously I know what foods will affect me by now. Honestly, I think putting so much effort into trying to be “perfect” or achieve the perfect BG levels is what ultimately causes us to get down on our selves and blame ourselves for not “doing better” or having better control over our diabetes. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve had a doctor look at me like I was such a failure after he/she went through my BG monitor because the numbers were all over the place. I still get anxiety about going to Dr. appointments because I hate that feeling of guilt! I’ve been putting off going to the endocrinologist for months now. What I’ve learned about how to cope is you do the best YOU can do. Every person is different and some one will always have their levels more under control than you or seem like they have it all figured out but that’s them. You will find the best way to deal with your diabetes. You mentioned you were diagnosed with depression and anxiety because of the depression so I say, focus on what makes you happy and the rest will fall into place. Yes I believe it is important to strive to be healthy and strive for better BG levels but your going to drive yourself insane trying to make it perfect 100 percent of the time. Diabetes is exhausting, give yourself a break after all were only human. Hope this helps. Keep your head up you got this!

  • #122778
  • My mother, grandmother, and great uncle all have T2D and they all do the same thing your fiance does. It is so draining. All I want to say to them is “SHUT UP! You don’t know how it feels or how hard it is.” Being T1D and being T2D are so different. I just really need to find someone that is about my age and has been T1D during the same age as I have had it.

    I also put off going to the endocrinologist. I feel like a small child getting in trouble for getting into the cookie jar everytime I go in. On top of that I REALLY have a hard time remembering to do my BS. So they want numbers and I don’t have them. I hate that aftr 2 decades I still can’t manage a simple finger poke before I eat.

  • #122779
  • Unfortunately, frequent testing is really the only way to achieve better management. You have to know where you’re starting from to correct going forward. Maybe set small goals for yourself–like testing twice a day. Then maybe a week later bump it to 3x, etc. Can you set alarms on your phone to remind yourself? It has to become part of your daily routine

  • #122781
  • You crave sugar when you are not getting enough insulin. Your blood sugar may be very high, but your cells are still starving. Keeping your blood glucose in a normal range will reduce your sweet cravings. Good luck. I watched my daughter scarf down a giant piece of birthday cake in literally eight seconds a few days before she was diagnosed. I didn’t know her cells were starving as I was mistakenly thinking “Oh no, my daughter is eating like an animal.” It’s a year later now and I noticed that she still craves sweets when her sugar is too high.

  • #123114
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